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HR Tech

Strengthening EM/PM partnership is the key to success in a software shop

Written by : Shyvee Shi on Digilah (Tech Thought Leadership)

📍 What does a PM (Product Manager) do?


PMs articulate the WHY through strategy, define the WHAT through prioritization, and play a supporting role for the HOW. 

📍 What does an EM (Engineering Manager) do?


EMs work with their teams to figure out HOW the product should be built (e.g., tech stack, frameworks, and architecture, etc.), WHO builds it and WHEN it will ship.

🔑 What are the expectations of an EM in a Tech organisation?

▪️ Active involvement in product brainstorming
▪️ Highlight technical complexity of a solution
▪️ Drive technical execution and decisions
▪️ Empathy for user and business needs
▪️ Manage sprint planning + retro
▪️ Embrace big picture thinking
▪️ Assume positive intent 

In a software shop, many roles cross paths on a daily basis but not more than the Engineering Manager (EM)’s and the Product Manager (PM)’s path.

🤝 This partnership is the one that not only ensures successful delivery of software but also things like motivation, transparency, alignment, prioritization, innovation and everything in between.

Starting from exploring the importance of this partnership, to setting the right expectations and sharing best practices. 


Here are five tips to strengthen the partnership: 👇

1 Build a relationship


This is one of the most critical relationships you will ever have at work. And just like any other relationship, you get what you give. Do not leave it up to chance. Get to know each other, understand each other’s goals, priorities, communication preferences, working style, etc. Schedule regular sync-up meetings and invest the time to deepen the relationship. 

2 Get on the same page


Make sure you represent a united front and be the cheerleaders for the team. There is nothing worse than a conflicting set of priorities for a team and ensuring that doesn’t happen starts with you two.


3 Assume Positive Intent (API)


The heading says it all. It’s busy, there is a lot going on at all times. There are many communication channels and oftentimes you end up doing or saying something that the other person doesn’t agree with. It’s okay. Assume positive intent. Reach out, verify, and reassure the trust.

4 Communicate early and frequently

This one cannot be emphasized enough. There should be a direct line of communication between the EM and the PM. Share even if you think it’s something trivial. Share your concerns, ideas, progress, feedback, and any other developing stories necessary. 

5 Shorten the feedback loop

 

🤝 The HOW part is a collaboration as both sides need input from each other to choose the optimal solution.

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Logistic & Travel Tech Web 3.0 Tech

What is virtual reality and why are aged care providers embracing it?

Written by : Colin Pudsey on Digilah (Tech Thought Leadership)

If you’ve been looking around at new ways to support your residents, chances are you’ve heard the words “virtual reality” being offered as a new idea. Maybe you’ve even seen pictures of people wearing headsets and waving their arms about.

But what is virtual reality, or VR, and why is it making such an impact in the aged care space?

Immersive beyond belief

Virtual reality is a simulated environment that looks and feels incredibly realistic. A key tool for using VR, is the headset, which allows you to explore this digital space by looking up, down and all around you. Unlike a computer or tablet which has a fixed field view, virtual reality adapts to your head movements to immerse you in a rich 360-degree, 3D environment.

This means that putting on a virtual reality headset feels like stepping into a completely different world. But the big question is, what can you do in this immersive virtual space?

The impossible becomes possible

Anything you can imagine! For the adrenaline seekers, how about skydiving, swimming with dolphins, or racing in an F1 car? For those looking for a calmer escape, maybe chilling out on the beach, exploring a tropical rainforest, or visiting a museum?

The technology is limitless, and it can even allow us to experience things that are impossible – a trip to mars perhaps? Or walking around the interior of the Titanic? VR can make that happen too.

That all sounds fun, but we’re talking about older adults here. Why would care providers be so keen to take their care recipients out of the four walls of a facility (virtually)?

Virtual experiences with clinical benefits

The answer lies in research, and whilst these experiences are certainly fun for all ages – they’re anything but frivolous. 

Virtual reality experiences have been shown to improve the quality of life in older adults. 

Participants in an American study were “less socially isolated… less likely to show signs of depression” and “feeling better about their overall wellbeing”. Another study from Taiwan revealed that VR “can provide older adults with the confidence to get involved in social activities”.

So, it’s clear that VR can have a range of positive impacts on care recipients. But the most exciting benefits of all, are linked to who we are as individuals.

A personal journey

Imagine being able to visit a childhood home, a church you were married in or a place you went on holidays with your family? For those of us born overseas, what about taking a journey back to experience familiar sights and sounds, and reconnect with your culture? Maybe a faith-based pilgrimage or personal spiritual practice?

VR is at its best when it’s partnered with a deep understanding of the individual and what’s important to them and that’s how innovative care providers are getting the most out of VR.

By building upon their strong connections with the individual, carers can deliver meaningful personalized experiences that leverage the power of VR to connect to identity.

For all walks of life

No matter what stage of life an individual is at, virtual reality may provide engagement, excitement, and an opportunity for connection.

Particularly for those of us supporting a loved one with dementia, as VR has been shown to “positively affect the cognitive and physical functioning of those with mild cognitive impairment or dementia”.

And what could be more important for someone living with dementia, than to reconnect them to their true self, their culture, and their loved ones. Now we’re really pushing the dial with “joy”!

Sometimes what’s important isn’t a clinical benefit…

Going beyond the clinical

What is immediately apparent when you try on a VR headset is that it’s like magic. Whilst there may be benefits in wellbeing and cognitive function, it’s an experience to bring wonder, enjoyment, and positive emotions and this can be supercharged when sharing the same experience in a group VR setting.

Any tool that can help bring significant and measurable joy, happiness, and excitement to the life of care recipients is one that’s worth exploring.

Ultimately, that might be the driving factor in the growing use of VR in the aged care space, a growth that’s led by innovative companies.

Changing Lives through Virtual Reality

Melbourne based virtual reality startup, SilVR Adventures, has been taking care of recipients on shared virtual reality experiences since 2019. 

Providing a turnkey VR solution to care providers across Australia and New Zealand, they enable care team members to take people with a variety of needs on immersive, group VR experiences.

Our content focuses on storytelling, emotional journeys and reminiscence therapy. We want to build engaging and inspiring experiences for older adults, no matter what stage of life they’re at.

With the largest library of world tours, spiritual journeys, and bucket list events, we’re experimenting with new ways to engage care recipients. But the real magic happens when the headset comes off.

Creating meaningful connections

The most powerful moments in working with VR are the social connections it stimulates.

“We’ve found that the winning formula is taking people on adventures together. They’ll have an amazing time travelling the world or experiencing something brand new, then the headsets come off and they’re chatting about where they went, where they want to go to next and sharing memories and stories from the past. It’s incredible to watch!”

And it’s clear that aged care providers agree too, with some around Australia establishing weekly ‘Travel Clubs’ to build camaraderie and friendship through shared experience across multiple sites.

We’re super excited to be able to connect up to 40 participants around the world in a shared virtual reality experience, then have them meet in a digital space afterwards like our virtual café and chat about it.

The ability to link people couldn’t have come at a better time with restrictions and lockdowns significantly increasing feelings of isolation, loneliness, and depression among our elders.

The future of the technology

Virtual reality has made great strides in the past few years, but it still has an exciting journey ahead. With companies like Facebook and Google making big investments in the space, it’s clear that the technology will continue to grow and develop.

There’s room to grow in the personal care space too, with VR companies pivoting away from residential facilities and beginning to offer services to be used in home care too.

“So far there’s nothing on offer for people in the home, that’s why SilVR Adventures is thrilled to be launching our home care solution in 2021. We’ll be able to support older adults aging in place with enhanced connections and deliver meaningful virtual adventures, in their own home – and that’s something to get excited about.

A rich and incredible virtual world

As we head towards 2023, there is still a lot of uncertainty, but whatever happens it’s clear that we need to find new ways to stay connected and engaged, and that couldn’t be truer for those of us receiving care.

Leading aged care providers around Australia are increasingly turning to the immersive power of VR as a potential tool for reducing isolation, improving wellbeing, and strengthening connections. 

Very soon personal carers in the home will be taking this technology for a spin too.

Watch a video to see how our seniors are enjoying themselves with the new found Virtual reality – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XYDr9PAQLMw

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Digi Tech

Digitally Yours

Written by Shivam Sharma on Digilah (Tech Thought Leadership)

In today’s time, technology is even in the deepest corners of each and every existing community of this world.

If I specifically speak about my own journey as an avid user of technology, I’ve been using technology ever since it came into popularity, but the density of use just multiplied by magnitudes when the pandemic hit.

Post-pandemic, things started bending towards creating content rather than just consuming it. Until the pandemic hit, I only used the technology towards a certain tangent and to a limit, which usually included digital classrooms, emails and just some YouTube videos. But, post-pandemic, the limit just became limitless with every dimension, everything just changed. 

Things like LinkedIn and Twitter came into my life and with that, creating content became a part of my life henceforth the digital journey became even more vivid and deep. You see, with the purge of this digital era, every single person on this planet has started building their own “digital personality” which generally comes with a cost, the cost of mental stability. Talking about myself, obviously, I am not the same person as I am on any social media platform, because it is just a part of my overall personality and not my only personality.

My journey has been very amazing because I have been witnessing the process of progress in the digital world ever since and it feels genuinely amazing to be a part of such a generation.

I mean with platforms like Google Meet, Zoom call or even Skype you can technically meet any human being in any corner of the world. With platforms like Notion you can basically create a second brain of yours with everything in and out of your brain and even your mind. 

With platforms like WhatsApp or messenger you can essentially talk to anybody without even meeting them.

With platforms like Slack and Wurker you can just make a virtual workspace altogether, just like your office.

With things like your own mobile phone or laptops you can just do whatever you want to and possibilities are just endless, literally, you may start tens of businesses just by an internet connection and a good laptop or workstation.

With things like Google Maps or any maps, you can just hop on to any place in the world in your choice of comfort!

 I, in my personal as well as my professional life, have been using such beautiful and radical pieces of technology and they have made my life much more efficient, all because of obvious reasons.

As a concluding note, I would just like to mention a cliche which is indeed the truth of the century, which is, “life wouldn’t have been fair without digitalisation”, also now that every digital element is it smartphones, laptops or even the internet is becoming so pocket-friendly with an amazing durability and quality, this saying just makes even more sense!

As you can probably see in the featured image, everything and anything which is visible is pretty much possible because of the digitalisation of major elements of life, be it communicating (telling and listening, not just hearing), expressing, sensing, feeling etc. 

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HR Tech

As we digitize, we need to humanize

Written by : Lori Figueiredo on Digilah (Tech Thought Leadership)

Co-create learning that has strategic impact, scalable reach and sustainable deployment

Ongoing waves of next generation technology…

As a learning strategist, I have been an early adopter throughout several waves of “next generation technology”.  In various forms, technology has always been and continues to be a very powerful enabler of learning.  This happens only when it is used as an integrated part of a learning strategy targeted to achieve pre-defined and measurable positive impact on performance (of the people and organisation).  

 

Recurring patterns 

I found the patterns and the simple rules within this complex world of people, performance and purpose, while working and learning globally with a diverse range of organisations from corporates, NGOs, governments, educational institutions to start-ups.

As technology evolves, some things remain the same…
The range of ways, in which humans react to any new technology, remain the same.  How we learn, how our brains work and the psychology of learning, remains the same. 

The paradox…

What has truly expanded is that we have more and more diverse, innovative, and impactful ways of how organisations could be enabling learning.  In addition, the pace, complexity and volume of what needs to be learned and unlearned has increased.  

Yet many organisations are still on the old island taking lecture-based classroom “training” &/or existing course content, which was not impactful in the first place and turning it into AI powered digital courses, virtual classrooms &/or even virtual reality experiences.

Formally support formal and informal learning

Let’s go back to the basics.  As a lifelong observer of people, I believe we have a natural capacity to learn, an innate wisdom as well as a need for connection and shared purpose.

Therefore learning works (i.e. has an impact on capabilities, behaviours and results) when we formally support both formal and informal learning.  Learning works when we respect our fellow human beings.  Learning works when we innovate with integrity leveraging the best in human psychology and the latest in technologyAs we digitise, we need to humanise.

Enabling the 3 ways we learn naturally

There are 3 ways we learn naturally.  In addition to this being based on research, take a moment to reflect on your own natural habits every day.  These include leveraging a combination of:

    • Digital Learning = Education via content available 24×7

    • Action Learning = Experiences to apply the learning while working

    • Social Learning = Exposure to learn from/with others

Organisations can therefore formally support learning as a daily habit by enabling a clear PROCESS which combines the 3 ways we learn.

Life is our classroom

Furthermore, every minute of the day we are presented with learning opportunities.  The millions of dollars invested in low-impact, high-cost learning solutions is a crime and defies basic common sense.  

It costs very little for any organisation to enable ongoing learning as a daily habit. It costs very little for the teams doing the real work, for example, to use their iphone cameras &/or basic PowerPoint to capture and share their tacit knowledge (Digital Learning).  

You do NOT need to do contrived role plays and irrelevant activities in a classroom when it costs very little to consciously apply what has been learned in the workplace (Action Learning).

In conjunction with the above, it costs and takes very little to reflect on and discuss with each other, experts, practitioners, coaches &/or mentors what has been achieved and what can be improved (Social Learning).

Observing and learning with high performing teams and organisations, I found 5Ps are always in place and aligned.  When we get the right PEOPLE together and support them to co-create a shared PURPOSE.  Thereafter, we put in place clear PROCESSES and the right PLATFORMS (online and offline) using clear guiding PRINCIPLES.  This creates a safe space that enables people to learn, adapt and improve as a daily habit.  

We found this applies irrespective of whether you are working with and upskilling underprivileged youth in the rural areas, private bankers in the big cities, operators in a factory, leaders in a board room or the frontliners of a popular restaurant brand.  

Technology amplifies, aggregates, increases accessibility and more…

What we are highlighting is that high performing organisations and teams create safe spaces to learn, adapt and improve every day.  They fail fast and learn faster.  Many call these agile teams and draw from the practices part of the agile approach, innovation and human centred design.  I draw on these and practices from development and cognitive psychology.

Whatever our source, how we learn and evolve as a human race from prehistoric times to today and in future, there is nothing that is completely new.  (Wall art and papyrus scrolls was the ancient form of technology (= makes things easier) and their form of digital learning available 24×7).

What continues to evolve is that technology takes what we do, accelerates and amplifies our efforts in ways that are even more scalable and sustainable.  For example, a great speaker can create and instantly broadcast a relevant and meaningful message company-wide to thousands of people in a few minutes using a live video.  

Technology allows us to aggregate, integrate and increase accessibility by bringing all the learning resources via an integrated or single front-end platform – from content, people to experiences.

Technology allows us to use AI such as sourcing very widely and then in seconds recommending relevant learning resources based on the Learner’s profile, needs and interests. 

Technology is allowing us to distribute, consume, exchange and track learning and its impact on results using web2 such as learning experience platforms and now web3 technology such as the blockchain, NFTs and virtual reality spaces

Design for impact; Don’t lead with technology

Yet as we leverage technology as an enabler of learning, the entire strategy must be designed for impact.  We must not lead with technology.  The technology as an enabler comes last in the design process.  We can also reverse engineer and then iterate the original design as we learn more about new ways technology can be used.  

We must design the end-to-end experience focusing on the human elements, human experience and impact. 

Digital learning using learning technology as a standalone, without the human element in the real-life context, will not impact performance.  It will not impact a change in our behaviours and results.

In addition to this – why learning technology is deployed and what capabilities it develops must consider human or soft skills.  Soft skills have never been more important.  Human intelligence combined with artificial intelligence is still the best combination.  For this and many other reasons, developing our empathy, resilience, problem solving and communication skill sets and mindset, as examples, remain as critical future skills as the hard technical skills of any role.
If we innovate with integrity leveraging the best in human psychology and the latest in technology – as we digitise in business, society and learning, we will remain human-centred.

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Med/Health Tech

Health tech a boon to Women’s health

Written by : Bhawana Yadav on Digilah (Tech Thought Leadership)

Women’s health is the most neglected sector, even after multiple attempts of bringing attention to it on different horizontal and vertical levels. According to WHO health is the culmination of the physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual well-being of an individual

A woman starts her biological journey from the onset of puberty, fertility years, and menopause, and till life continues. 

LevelUpForWomen, a women’s health and wellness-based startup working on the niche of reversing PCOS was co-founded by partners Chetan Arora and Bhawana Yadav. Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome is a common endocrine disturbance that affects roughly 6% to 12% of women of reproductive age. The data is still insufficient as most of the women go undiagnosed due to several factors in their lives and the lack of PCOS-based specific scientific research and developments.

 The startup was conceived based on personal experience and lack of guidance by the medical fraternity for the initial years of bearing with PCOS symptoms. It is currently bootstrapped and is already on the profitable side from the business perspective. 

Technology has been a boon for women’s healthcare, especially in the post-pandemic world. It can be looked at from both the sociological and economic lens to arrive at the conclusion that healthcare and technology are a great combination for the knowledge and wellness revolution. 

In a research conducted by Mckinsey, they analyzed 763 FemTech companies (FemTech a term coined by entrepreneur Ida Tin) largely tech-based and enabled, consumer-centric solutions addressing women’s health, excluding biopharma and incumbent medical devices as well as the companies which included unisex services.

It concluded the beginning of the FemTech revolution and domination in public awareness and generating large-scale funding, However, the services were earlier limited to menstrual products, devices, and applications. 

New startups like LevelUpForWomen have proven to be a one-stop virtual healthcare and wellness platform. 

In our experience and case studies, technology in terms of social media has become a great tool for social awareness and probing to take an action even if you are sitting in the far remote corner of the country.

It does not just act as a catalyst and solution provider to the direct consumer but also a great medium to sensitise other genders and generations which have hushed over women’s reproductive health for centuries. 

In the post-pandemic world, the mental and physical health of women has undergone a major toll, being the bearer of family and trying to manage work-life balance has become even more difficult. The results are visible in hormonal imbalances, increased stress, anxiety, and depression cases. Women feel safer reaching out to judgement

-free healthcare solutions online rather than visiting traditional clinics where the approach is the same as it was 20 years ago. 

The FemTech revolution in the healthcare industry is still in a nascent stage and will take time to be accepted in Tier-2 cities with fewer apprehensions but it is the dawn of the future.

Women are finding a supportive community via these technological mediums and a platform to grow and heal and restore balance in their lives. These developments promise a tomorrow where health tech will not just expand the female consumer-oriented business but also provide an opportunity for groundbreaking research and growth for sustainable women’s health. 

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AI Tech

5 Levels of Autonomy in Vehicles

Witten by Oliver-Werner K. on Digilah (Tech Thought Leadership)

Levels 0 to 5

Level 0 – No Automation. The human at the wheel steers, brakes, accelerates, and negotiates traffic.

Level 1 – Driver Assistance. …

Level 2 – Partial Automation. …

Level 3 – Conditional Automation. …

Level 4 – High Automation. …

Level 5 – Full Automation.

Researchers forecast that by 2025 we’ll see approximately 8 million autonomous or semi-autonomous vehicles on the road. Before merging onto roadways, self-driving cars will first have to progress through 6 levels of driver assistance technology advancements.

What exactly are these levels? And where are we now? 

The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) defines 6 levels of driving automation ranging from 0 (fully manual) to 5 (fully autonomous). These levels have been adopted by the U.S. Department of Transportation. 

Level 0 (No Driving Automation)

Most vehicles on the road today are Level 0: manually controlled. The human provides the dynamic driving task although there may be systems in place to help the driver. An example would be the emergency braking system―since it technically doesn’t “drive” the vehicle, it does not qualify as automation. 

Level 1 (Driver Assistance)

This is the lowest level of automation. The vehicle features a single automated system for driver assistance, such as steering or accelerating (cruise control). Adaptive cruise control, where the vehicle can be kept at a safe distance behind the next car, qualifies as Level 1 because the human driver monitors the other aspects of driving such as steering and braking. 

Level 2 (Partial Driving Automation)

This means advanced driver assistance systems or ADAS. The vehicle can control both steering and accelerating/decelerating. Here the automation falls short of self-driving because a human sits in the driver’s seat and can take control of the car at any time. Tesla Autopilot and Cadillac (General Motors) Super Cruise systems both qualify as Level 2.

Level 3 (Conditional Driving Automation)

The jump from Level 2 to Level 3 is substantial from a technological perspective, but subtle if not negligible from a human perspective.

Level 3 vehicles have “environmental detection” capabilities and can make informed decisions for themselves, such as accelerating past a slow-moving vehicle. But―they still require human override. The driver must remain alert and ready to take control if the system is unable to execute the task.

Almost two years ago, Audi (Volkswagen) announced that the next generation of the A8―their flagship sedan―would be the world’s first production Level 3 vehicle. And they delivered. The 2019 Audi A8L arrives in commercial dealerships this Fall. It features Traffic Jam Pilot, which combines a lidar scanner with advanced sensor fusion and processing power (plus built-in redundancies should a component fail).

However, while Audi was developing their marvel of engineering, the regulatory process in the U.S. shifted from federal guidance to state-by-state mandates for autonomous vehicles. So for the time being, the A8L is still classified as a Level 2 vehicle in the United States and will ship without key hardware and software required to achieve Level 3 functionality. In Europe, however, Audi will roll out the full Level 3 A8L with Traffic Jam Pilot (in Germany first). 

artificial intelligence

Level 4 (High Driving Automation)

The key difference between Level 3 and Level 4 automation is that Level 4 vehicles can intervene if things go wrong or there is a system failure. In this sense, these cars do not require human interaction in most circumstances. However, a human still has the option to manually override.

Level 4 vehicles can operate in self-driving mode. But until legislation and infrastructure evolves, they can only do so within a limited area (usually an urban environment where top speeds reach an average of 30mph). This is known as geofencing. As such, most Level 4 vehicles in existence are geared toward ridesharing. For example:

NAVYA, a French company, is already building and selling Level 4 shuttles and cabs in the U.S. that run fully on electric power and can reach a top speed of 55 mph.

Alphabet’s Waymo recently unveiled a Level 4 self-driving taxi service in Arizona, where they had been testing driverless cars―without a safety driver in the seat―for more than a year and over 10 million miles.

Canadian automotive supplier Magna has developed technology (MAX4) to enable Level 4 capabilities in both urban and highway environments. 

They are working with Lyft to supply high-tech kits that turn vehicles into self-driving cars.Just a few months ago, Volvo and Baidu announced a strategic partnership to jointly develop Level 4 electric vehicles that will serve the robotaxi market in China.

Level 5 (Full Driving Automation)

Level 5 vehicles do not require human attention―the “dynamic driving task” is eliminated. Level 5 cars won’t even have steering wheels or acceleration/braking pedals. They will be free from geofencing, able to go anywhere and do anything that an experienced human driver can do. Fully autonomous cars are undergoing testing in several pockets of the world, but none are yet available to the general public!

 

(Source1: https://www.synopsys.com/automotive/autonomous-driving-levels.html)

(Source2: https://newsroom.intel.com/news/autonomous-driving-hands-wheel-no-wheel-all/)

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AI Tech Web 3.0 Tech

Web3.0:The Real decentralized Internet 

Written by Femi Omoshona on Digilah (Tech Thought Leadership)

Decentralized technology is the present and the early we start investing our time, energy and resources trying to understand what future DApp looks like the better for us. 

Blockchain, AI, AR and IOT are amazing technologies we should be wrapping our brain around in this 21st century.

In this article, I lay out how the web has evolved, where it’s going next, and how Africa as a continent can position itself for the future.

Think about how the internet affects your life on a daily basis since it was discovered in early 1990. Internet, a system architecture that has revolutionized communications and methods of commerce by allowing various computer networks around the world to interconnect. Sometimes referred to as a network of networks, the Internet emerged in the United States in the 1970s but did not become visible to the general public until the early 1990s.

By 2020, approximately 4.5 billion people, or more than half of the world’s population, were estimated to have access to the Internet.

The Evolution of the Web

The evolution of the web can be classified into three separate stages: Web 1.0, Web 2.0, and Web 3.0.

Web 1.0  are static web sites and personal sites, the term used for the earliest version of the Internet as it emerged from its origins with Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and became, for the first time, a global network representing the future of digital communications. Web 1.0  offered little information and was accessible to users across the world; these pages had little or no functionality, flexibility, or user-generated content.

Web 2.0 is called the “read/write” web, which seems to indicate an updated version of the current World Wide Web, which is known as Web 1.0. It’s more accurate to think of Web 2.0 as a shift in thinking and focus on web design. Instead of static HTML pages with little or no interaction between users, Web 2.0 represents a shift to interactive functionality and compatibility through some of the following features: User-generated content, Transparency in data and integrations.

Web 3.0 (…Loading)

Web 3.0 is the next stage of the web evolution that would make the internet more intelligent or process information with near-human-like intelligence through the power of AI systems that could run smart programs to assist users.

Tim Berners-Lee had said that the Semantic Web is meant to “automatically” interface with systems, people and home devices. As such, content creation and decision-making processes will involve both humans and machines. This would enable the intelligent creation and distribution of highly-tailored content straight to every internet consumer.

Key Features of Web 3.0

To really understand the next stage of the internet, we need to take a look at the four key features of Web 3.0:

Semantic Web

Semantic(s) is the study of the relationship between words. Therefore, the Semantic Web, according to Berners-Lee, enables computers to analyze loads of data from the Web, which includes content, transactions and links between persons.

Artificial Intelligence

Web 3.0 machines can read and decipher the meaning and emotions conveyed by a set of data, it brings forth intelligent machines. Although Web 2.0 presents similar capabilities, it is still predominantly human-based, which opens up room for corrupt behaviors such as biased product reviews, rigged ratings, etc.

For instance, online review platforms like Trustpilot provide a way for consumers to review any product or service. Unfortunately, a company can simply gather a large group of people and pay them to create positive reviews for its undeserving products. Therefore, the internet needs AI to learn how to distinguish the genuine from the fake in order to provide reliable data.

Web3.0 future for Africa

Across the world, the new Web3 economy is giving birth to myriad opportunities and the implications for the African continent are massive. Code 247 Foundation is on a mission to raised the next generation of Africa talent who will leverage the latest blockchain technologies to provide real value to billions of unbanked, underbanked and underserved individuals across Africa and other emerging markets, and we’re excited to see various blockchain protocols, startups, investors, grant funders and governments interested in doing the same.

Web3 can open up an intra-African exchange economy, it can be used for purchases and transportation between African nations. It will assist Africans to generate more economic value in a wider market.

In Africa, the evolution of blockchain technology has interested many governments across the Africa countries  to explore blockchain-based solutions, creating Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) that are likely to develop a more informed approach to the Web3 economy along with policy frameworks in line with the needs of everyday users.

Web 3 can be used to solve some of the challenges in Africa, issues of land ownership:

It is no secret the messy land management in most African countries has made it harder for citizens to acquire genuine land. This has meant that most communities are left poor due to lack of access to manage and develop their lands. Other challenges include faulk drugs, financial transactions and management of traffic etc.

Conclusion

We believe in Africa 100%. Africa can be great, will be great and must be great. Blockchain and Web3 technologies will be revolutionary in Africa. There are a lot of problems with currency and corruption in Africa.

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Categories
Art Tech Web 3.0 Tech

NFT Can Be A Force For Positive Social Impact

Witten by Darren Tan on Digilah (Tech Thought Leadership)

With all the ongoing debate about the inherent value of NFT, for myself, as the founder of Digital Arts For Social Impact (DASI) , I believe that NFT can be an effective channel for positive social impact. 

NFT started in the year of 2012, backed by the basis of bitcoin then, since Etherium hadn’t started before then – and since that point, there have been many ongoing conversations as well as trades that have happened on the digital space.

Some see it as an opportunity to get rich quick, given the number of rug pulls that has happened due to insider traders making a quick run after a successful fund raise, while others see it as an opportunity to express their art – and letting keen buyers own an original authentic piece of their work without any potential risk of inauthentic duplication

NFT Art-tech

For myself, my exposure to NFT, blockchain as well as Web 3.0 definitely changed the way he viewed work as well as the digital space, and it definitely pivoted me from being a typical salaryman to someone who can also create positive social impact with the help of NFTs

Afterall, the basis behind the creation of an NFT can be condensed into 7 simple steps:

1) Create/pick your artwork/ unique creation

2) Choose your choice of blockchain tech

3) Setting up your digital wallet for          transaction

4) Shortlist & Select your NFT marketplace.

5) Upload your NFTs

6) Develop a robust sales & marketing plan for your NFTS

7) Fund-raising and channeling it to an effective cause

In fact, it was with this knowledge that I have also invested heavily into ethereum as well as developed a robust team made up of industry veterans as well as artists across the globe, to serve the impoverished community around the world – one of which being Cambodia.

For DASI’s very 1st upcoming project, Darren & his team made up of industry veterans as well as artists across the globe, they have ambitiously set their sights to help impoverished Cambodian kids to fund raise for their very own school – with hopes that this will be
a beacon for future NFT projects that will lead to support more social causes.

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Security Tech

Protecting your personal data in times of uncertainty

Written by – Kiran Kari on Digilah (Tech Thought Leadership)

It has been couple of years since COVID-19 brought the world to a standstill. While countries are opening their borders for business and tourism, it wasn’t long ago that the world shut itself up in a cocoon. The pandemic brought a lot of good when the going was bad. The good was brewing in the human mind – innovation! Businesses and large enterprises have found new ways to engage, employees have found ways to be efficient and productive, and consumers have found creative ways to purchase and consume. 

In the pandemic, the consumer was wary about touching soiled currency notes, the interactive screen at the ATM, or share their credit/debit cards to make that necessary purchase. These are all high touch points in a daily life. The only way to overcome these challenges was through usage of mobile apps. Mobile apps provided us with the convenience of booking a taxi, ordering food or make payments without making physical contact with a third person. 

Like it is in any business, with every advantage comes the corresponding disadvantage. The use of banking and financial mobile apps was always certain to grow but, in the pandemic, it grew much faster than anticipated. No one expected the number of users accessing digital services would grow so fast, so soon and so exponentially high. With such high usage in digital payments also came the threat in the form of malicious actors or more commonly known as, hackers

Banks, wallet payments firms or any enterprise with a consumer facing mobile app need to protect their apps from the threat vectors emanating from their consumers devices. Similarly, the consumer must be equally responsible for their own data and privacy. The hackers are looking for ways and means to steal credentials, data, create fraud, take over accounts, change the behaviors of the apps, etc., all of which amount to huge losses to the business and the consumer alike. Hackers have access to very sophisticated tools to ‘mix and match’ their attacks. A lot of compromises to the consumer devices happen through sophisticated malware, screen overlay attacks, advanced jail break or rooting techniques, root enablers and reverse engineering.

There have been many instances of hacks and compromises across the world in the recent past and it will continue to make headlines. Most recently, the OCBC bank SMS scam in Singapore lead to huge losses to account holders and the bank was penalized heavily by the regulators. So, what can we do as consumers to keep ourselves safe?

It is a healthy practice to not only keep your mobile devices clean and safe but also be cautious about your surroundings. Some of the basic hygiene that you can follow is as below:   

Some of the basic hygiene that you can follow is as below:

  • To begin, don’t click on the links that come as text messages (or email) on any of your messaging platforms, especially when it is from an unknown source. This is the biggest reason for phishing attacks. Phishing scams look so real that you end up thinking its genuine.
  • Similarly, be wary of vishing attacks, wherein someone calls you, pretends to be from your bank or a government agency and have you share your critical data, OTP, et al. 
  • When in doubt, call your bank or the agency to verify the information. When you know it’s not true, register your complaint on the fake call you received. Be a good Samaritan. 
  • Never share your personal information with any unauthorized person. No legal entity will ask you to part with your personal data. 
  • There are many frauds happening on social media platforms including your messaging apps. Don’t fall prey for anything that looks too good to be true.
  • Always download apps from the authorized app or play store.
  • Do not jail break or root your mobile devices. 
  • Ensure that you have a well-known anti-virus installed on your phone that also checks for phishing attacks.
  • Never store critical info like passwords, bank account information, etc. on your mobile devices.
  • Spend some time educating yourself on cybercrimes.

In the current climate of uncertainty, it is impossible to predict what is going to happen next. But we know that the malicious actors are going to be a lot more active than ever before.

It is time for consumers to be data proactive and strengthen the security on their mobile devices. 

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Security Tech Med/Health Tech

Security & Privacy by Design – Health Data Management Policy

Written by : Sujeet Katiyar on Digilah (Tech Thought Leadership)

Every byte of data has a story to share. Important question is whether the story is being narrated accurately and securely. Usually, our focus is sharply on the trends around data with a goal of revenue acceleration, but we commonly forget about the vulnerabilities caused due to bad data management. Data possesses immense power, but immense power comes with increased responsibility. Just collecting, analysing and building prediction models is simply not enough in today’s world. Always keep in mind that we are in a generation where the requirements for data security have perhaps surpassed the need for data correctness. Hence today the need for Privacy by Design is greater than ever.

“Privacy by Design” and “Privacy by Default” have been frequently discussed topics related to data protection. The first thoughts of “Privacy by Design” were expressed in the 1970s and were incorporated in the 1990s into the RL 95/46/EC data protection directive. Privacy by design is an approach to systems engineering that seeks to ensure protection for the privacy of individuals by integrating considerations of privacy issues from the very beginning of the development of products, services, business practices, and physical infrastructures. The adoption of security and privacy principles is a crucial step in building a secure, audit-ready program.
Privacy by Design is based on 7 principles:

Privacy by Design is based on following 7 principles:

  1. Proactive not Reactive; Preventative not Remedial – Privacy by Design comes before-the-fact, not after.
  2. Privacy as the Default Setting – it is built into the system, by default.
  3. Privacy by Design is embedded into the design and architecture of IT systems and business practices
  4. Privacy by Design seeks to accommodate all legitimate interests and objectives in a positive-sum “win-win” manner not Zero-Sum
  5. End-to-End Security — Full Life-cycle Protection
  6. Visibility and Transparency — Privacy by Design seeks to assure all stakeholders that whatever the business practice or technology involved, it is in fact, operating according to the stated promises and objectives
  7. Respect for User Privacy — Keep it User-Centric.

Privacy by Design in Health Data Management Policy by ABDM

Consider data protection requirements as part of the design and implementation of systems, services, products, and business practices. The federated design of the National Digital Health Ecosystem ensures that no personal data other than what is required at a minimum to create and maintain Health IDs, Facility IDs or Health Professional IDs shall be stored centrally. Electronic medical records shall be stored at the health facility where such records are created, or at such other entities as may be specified by Policy. Electronic health records shall be maintained by entities specified by Policy, as a collection of links to the related medical records. ABDM shall issue appropriate technological and operational guidelines providing for the establishment and maintenance of the federated architecture, for ensuring the security and privacy of the personal data of data principals, and for maintenance of electronic medical records and electronic health records.

 Health Data Management Policy by ABDM

Prepare a privacy policy containing the following information:

  1. Clear and easily accessible statements of its practices and policies.
  2. Type of personal or sensitive personal data collected.
  3. The purpose of collection and usage of such personal or sensitive personal data.
  4. Whether personal or sensitive personal data is being shared with other data fiduciaries or data processors.
  5. Reasonable security practices and procedures used by the data fiduciary to safeguard the personal or sensitive personal data that is being processed.

The privacy policy referred shall be published on the website of the data fiduciary. In addition, the data fiduciary shall also make available a privacy by design policy on its website containing the following information:

  1. The managerial, organisational, business practices and technical systems designed to anticipate, identify and avoid harm to the data principal.
  2. The obligations of data fiduciaries.
  3. The technology used in the processing of personal data, in accordance with commercially accepted or certified standards.
  4. The protection of privacy throughout processing from the point of collection to deletion of personal data.
  5. The processing of personal data in a transparent manner and
  6. The fact that the interest of the data principal is accounted for at every stage of processing of personal data.

The privacy policy issued and the principles of privacy by design followed by the data fiduciaries should be in consonance with this Policy and applicable law.

Article by Sujeet Katiyar

Digital Health । Rural Healthcare । Regulatory Compliance । ABDM, HIPAA, GDPR, Data Security & Privacy Professional as Consultant, Start-up Founder, Director with 23 years in Web & Mobile Technology with AI, ML, Blockchain

 

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